Testimonials

The service,facilities and support provided to me by Graduate study is exceptional and overwhelming. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Mr. Geoff Abbott and Mr. Mreenal Chakroborty for their sustenance. Mr Geoff has guided me throughout the progression and his vibrant presence has made the whole process of studying in UK so easier for me. 

 

 

Partners

Please select your questions from the menu below, if you have any further queries please do not hesitate to contact us:


Studying in the UK:

 Opening a UK Bank Account
        Opening a UK Bank Account

Insurance
        Insurance

Health and Medical Care
        Doctor
        Dentist
        Optician

Police Registration
        Police Registration

Keeping Safe in the UK
        Keeping Safe in the UK

Transport
        Transport
        Trains
        Buses / Coaches
        Taxis

Obeying the Laws
        Obeying the Law
        Smoking
        Alcohol
        Drugs

Opening a UK Bank Account

We would suggest that students who are studying in the UK for at least 6 months should open a bank account in the UK as soon as possible after their arrival. To open a bank account you will need to take your passport and a letter from your College / University that confirms what course you are studying on and that you are a genuine student. Banks will not open accounts for students studying for a shorter period. A number of Universities have banks located on their actual Campus. 

We would also suggest that you make contact with your bank or your parent's bank in your home country and see if that bank has facilities or arrangements with a UK bank. 

We can answer any further questions you may have about UK bank accounts but all of our partner universities and colleges will be able to help you on your arrival.

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Insurance

Students are advised to insure personal property against loss or theft as soon as possible after arrival. All our Universities and Colleges can help you with this. Please check your insurance policy carefully to ensure that all your possessions are covered. Endsleigh Insurance is an excellent student focused insurance organisation that has significant experience of insuring student's possessions as well as providing medical cover whilst they are studying in the UK. They have a special policy for international students that includes the cost of getting you home if you are taken seriously ill. Their website address is www.endsleigh.co.uk

If you have your own medical insurance cover in your home country it is advisable to see whether you are covered by it while you are studying in the UK. It may be possible to extend this cover for your stay in the UK.

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Doctor

All students on a course lasting more than six months are entitled to free medical treatment at a doctor's medical practice or at a hospital. You are advised to register with a local doctor (known as a GP or General Practitioner) as soon as you are able after your arrival at university or college. Your university or college will have details of local medical practices that normally register their students but it will be best to call the medical practice first to see if they are willing to accept you as a patient. 

To register with them you will need your passport and a letter from your college as evidence that you are studying in the UK before they will register you. Currently there will be a charge of £7-20 for each medicine prescribed to you by a GP.

If you require regular medical treatment you are advised to see your own doctor before you leave your home country to tell them that you will be living and studying in the UK. You should make sure that you bring details of your medical condition and normal treatment required with you as well as a reasonable supply of your medicines that will last you until you can register with a UK doctor.



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Dentist

Dental treatment in the UK has to be paid for and you need to be registered with a doctor in order to be treated on the UK's National Health Service which will be at a reduced cost. Private dental care is available at a higher cost.

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Optician

If you wear glasses it is advisable to bring a spare of glasses with you in case of loss or damage. If you wear contact lenses bring a supply of solutions with you and get advice from your optician.

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Police Registration

Your visa or stamp in your passport will tell you if you are required to register with the police which you must do within 7 days of arriving in the UK. If this applies to you, you will need to take your passport, two passport photographs, an acceptance letter from the College or University where you are studying and the registration fee per person to a main police station in the place where you are studying. 

You must inform the police within 7 days if you change your UK address or if you receive a visa extension. 

Please note: Failure to register with the police is a breach of your immigration conditions.

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Keeping Safe in the UK

 The UK is one of the safest places in the world to live so most crimes are small and opportunist.

This may be the first time that you are away from your home country so it is important for you to keep yourself and your valuables safe so it is worth considering a few things:

  1. Think at all times were your bag, mobile telephone and wallet are and do not put any of these in the back pocket of your trousers.
  2. Do not walk home alone late at night. Think ahead and make sure you can get home safely by either getting a lift with friends or by booking a taxi.
  3. Never leave drinks unattended in pubs, bars or clubs and this applies to men and women.
  4. Be aware of your surroundings at all times and be careful when using your IPod or MP3 Player in public as you might not hear someone approaching.
  5. Do not have your name and address visible on any bag tags.
  6. Never give anyone your PIN number e.g. for your bank card and do not write it down anywhere or carry it with your card.


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Transport

Public transport in the UK is generally of a high standard but can be expensive. Buses or coaches are cheaper than trains but you may have a longer journey time. Taxis are plentiful and convenient but can be very expensive.

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Trains

Trains can be fast and convenient but are expensive and are often crowded at peak times.

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Buses / Coaches

Buses and coaches run throughout the UK and often duplicate many rail routes and can be half the price of train travel. The journey time can be similar to that by train but they can be seriously affected by traffic delays and it could take much longer to reach your destination to that which is advertised. With the rise in train fares, these bus and coach services are becoming more popular so it is a good idea to buy a 'reserved' ticket which will guarantee you a seat.

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Taxis

Taxis in most UK towns and cities are plentiful but can be expensive. Always ask at the start of your journey what the expected cost is likely to be. Most taxis have meters which can be clearly seen.

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Obeying the Law

Ignorance of the law is not sufficient if you are found to be breaking the law so be extremely careful.

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Smoking

In the UK, smoking is prohibited inside all public buildings (including bars and restaurants), on public transport (buses, taxis, trains). You should always ask before smoking in someone else's car or home.

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Alcohol

It is illegal for anyone under the age of 18 to purchase alcohol or have it purchased for them by an adult. Pubs, bars and clubs are very strict about preventing underage drinking therefore make sure you have some form of identification with you (for example your passport) if you are going out in the evening to prove you are 18 years old or over.

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Drugs

It is illegal to do the following:

Possess a drug which is a controlled substance.

  1. Possess a controlled substance with the intent of supply.
  2. To supply unlawfully a controlled drug even when no money changes hands.
  3. To allow premises you occupy to be used for the purpose of drug-taking.

 

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